5-year-old Palestinian schools Israeli soldiers on War Crimes

1-minute video: 5-year-old Palestinian schools Israeli soldiers on War Crimes

5-year-old Janna Ayyad shames Israeli soldiers with Sami Yusuf?s poetry:

All your armies, all your fighters,
All your tanks, and all your soldiers,
Against a boy holding a stone.
Standing there all alone,
In his eyes I see the sun.
In his smile I see the moon.
And I wonder, I only wonder.
Who is weak, and who is strong?
Who is right, and who is wrong?
And I wish, I only wish,
That the truth has a tongue!

Open House for Butterflies

Ruth Krauss?s Final and Loveliest Collaboration with Maurice Sendak

by?
?Krauss books can be bridges between the poor dull insensitive adult and the fresh, imaginative, brand-new child.?
Beloved children?s author?Ruth Krauss?(July 25, 1901?July 10, 1993) penned more than thirty books for little ones over the course of her forty-year career, but remains best-known as half of one of the most celebrated author-illustrator duos of all time, the other half being none other thanMaurice Sendak. Their eight-year partnership, masterminded by the great?Ursula Nordstrom?who also?nursed Sendak into genius, produced such soul-stirring, heart-warming delights as the hopelessly wonderful ode to friendship?I?ll Be You and You Be Me. But Krauss?s eighth and final* collaboration with Sendak,?Open House for Butterflies?(public library), was arguably their loveliest. Originally published in 1960 and thankfully, unlike what happens to?a tragic many out-of-print gems, reprinted in 2001, this tiny treasure is a timeless smile-inducer for children and grown-ups alike.
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The Obama Hypocrisy

Do Arabs Cry For Their Children Too?

by TOM MCNAMARA Counter Punch

Rennes, France.
Once more tragedy befalls America. But this time the tragedy is even more bitter due to the fact that such a large number of young children were involved. A gunman, identified as Adam Lanza, shot and killed 26 people, 20 of them children ? all between the ages of 5 and 10 ? at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, on the 14thof December. The attack ended with the gunman committing suicide. It was the Nation?s second deadliest school shooting.
Most people can?t imagine the evil and insanity needed to drive a person to commit such a heinous act. The murder of innocent people is reprehensible, but it is even more so when carried out on the most vulnerable elements of our society, children. Most disturbing of all is the well planned, deliberate and determined manner in which the murders appear to have been carried out. Early reports state that the gunman was highly accurate, leaving only one wounded survivor alive at the school. Continue reading “The Obama Hypocrisy”

Shake up your story

Artist Raghava KK demos his new children’s book for iPad with a fun feature: when you shake it, the story — and your perspective — changes. In this charming short talk, he invites all of us to shake up our perspective a little bit.
Please retweet #children #art #ipad

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Children's Eyes on Earth

2012 photography contest

Thousands of young photographers worldwide submitted their images to the?youth photography contest, which aims to raise awareness of environmental issues. Children aged 17 and under were encouraged to illustrate the themes of ‘I love nature’ and ‘I hate pollution’. Here are the winning shots, along with a selection from those shortlisted

Reza Deghati, the organiser of the contest, was the first tutor at Pathshala way back in 1998 who then went on to form the media organisation Aina in Afghanistan. Drik and Aina were partners in the Fredskorpset exchange. Reza was the guest of honour at Drik’s 23rd anniversary.

SOS by Anastasya Vorobko, 8, Russia, first prize winner

Grain by Sazzid Ahmed, 17, Bangladesh, shortlisted

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Children's Eyes on Earth

National Geographic photographer Reza Deghati was the first visiting faculty member of Pathshala, the South Asian Media Academy. He was involved in a series of three workshops spread over two years organised by World Press Photo Foundation. He was joined by Chris Boot, Rob Mountfort and Robert Pledge as well as Maarten Koets of World Press Photo and Zimbabwean photographer Trevor Davis. Reza talks about a new photo contest for children which he has initiated.

Palestinian children 'abused' in Israeli jail

Recent studies allege a system of abuse targeting children detained by Israel’s military court system.
Dalia Hatuqa?Al Jazeera report

Israeli military courts imprison about 500-700 Palestinian children per year, according to a new study (AFP)

Ramallah, occupied Palestinian territories –?A dirty mattress fills up a space barely two metres long and?one metre wide. A suffocating stench emanating from the toilet hovers over the windowless room, and a light turned on 24/7 means sleep is a distant dream. This is the infamous Cell 36 in Al Jalameh Prison in Israel. It’s one of the cells that many Palestinian children have either heard of or, worse, been inside when placed in solitary confinement.
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Why do schools really stop parents taking photographs of their children?

Taking photographs of children in public has become a fraught issue, says Josie Appleton

 The Guardian

A photographer with a camera

A photographer with a camera. Photograph: David Levene for the Guardian
Sue Rice got a shock when she opened her daughter’s nursery yearbook to see the photograph of the smiling four-year-olds. Their eyes had been blacked out. Sue is one of a group of parents affected by a de facto photography ban at their primary school in a quiet area of Hertfordshire. It started with a notice in the school newsletter saying that no photography was permitted at the nativity play, but that parents could buy a DVD for ?12. Continue reading “Why do schools really stop parents taking photographs of their children?”

We

We!
The children are reduced to bones
And skin.  Their tiny bodies
Have heads appearing far too large
And eyes that cry for help.
But there’s no shortage yet of guns
And bullets — or of bombs.
And soon enough, you hear them come —
The jets that scream through skies
And drop the rain that’s so obscene
That voices then fall still.
******
 
The drones that fly like sightless birds,
The tanks that roll through streets,
The men who fire on passers by,
Who buys and pays these?
We!
****** Continue reading “We”