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Tag: Nepal

Resilience and Reasons

Nepal Earthquake by Abir Abdullah
text by ?Photographer Syed Latif Hossain?
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Our sub-continent is now emerging from a crucial experience of its history. This history narrates defining moments captured in epic tragedy, inflicted wounds that are slowly fortifying, and material and spiritual loss that would be embalmed in the hearts of generations. On a seemingly normal weekend day as people went about their business, the earth in Nepal shook up its natives to the point of unfamiliarity. An earthquake, that registered 7.8 on the Richter scale. It caused many people to flee and it rendered many others immobile; and it caused hearts to freeze as they witnessed their world crumbling around them. A sea of hearts, many which remained trapped in the sea of rubble, with their homes, their temples and their loved ones.

Film South Asia '13 Call for Entries

Calling for entries for the ninth edition of Film Southasia ?13, the festival of Southasian documentaries. The festival will be held in Kathmandu, Nepal from 3-6 October 2013.
Film Southasia (FSA) is a biennial festival that was set up in 1997 with the goal of popularising the documentary so that it entertains, informs and changes lives. In addition to the festival that takes place in Kathmandu every two years, FSA organizes screenings, discussions and workshops across Southasia to promote Southasian non-fiction within the Subcontinent and around the world. Film Southasia believes that film is a powerful medium that helps to not only in better represent the region internationally, but also contributes immensely in introspection and initiatives to bring change at the local level.

MEMORY & IDENTITY

WORKSHOPS in Nepal by Annu Palakunnathu Matthew

Organised by Photo Circle 3 – 6 December 2012 


Old photographs remind us of our past and where we have come from and the silent stories that these photographs insinuate. Participants will reconsider notions of perception of memory and identity as they relate to history and photography?s presumed veracity. To create work, participants will explore existing photo archives, their own family photographs, film footage and objects related to their families in order to create work related to their identity and perceived memories. The workshop?s primary focus will be related to photography but participants can use this as a springboard for creating work in other media such as collages, stop motion animations, videos and installations, sound installations, oral histories, etc. Discussions and slide shows will be conducted in the mornings and students are expected to work on their projects in the afternoons. This workshop is for anyone- writers, musicians, housewives, photographers- who would like to explore the way memory can be shaped and reshaped.

Chronicler of conflicts

Chronicler of conflicts – The Times of India.

?By?Jaideep Mazumdar

Trainers Greg Marinovich (South Africa), Per Anders (Norway) and Munem Wasif (Bangladesh) in workshop in Kolkata organised by Pathshala (Bangladesh) and Oslo University College (Norway), with students in Kolkata. The local organisers were Drik India

Greg Marinovich in classroom in Kolkata

Greg Sebastian Marinovich is the only one of the ‘Bang Bang Club’s’ four members to be standing on his feet today. Two are dead and the third’s legs have been amputated. Between them, they share two Pulitzers and a host of other prestigious awards from all over the world. Greg, 50, co-authored a book on the ‘club’ that was made into a film two years ago. And what a film it was: a visual narrative on the lives of four ‘conflict photographers’–all white South Africans who grew up in the apartheid regime, opposed it and exposed the apartheid regime-sponsored violence to the world-whose lives intertwined and took them to many parts of the world to record telling images of war and strife.
Greg, who was in Kolkata to conduct a workshop for photographers from India, Nepal and?Bangladesh?(Editor’s note: organised by Pathshala in Bangladesh and Oslo University College in Norway), told TOI about his work and experiences.

Happy February!
We are in the middle of a very stimulating workshop with 14 Bangladeshi, Nepali and Norwegian students and award winning photographer Philip Blenkinsop. The workshop is the beginning of an extended exchange program where participating students will produce an in-depth photo reportage project.

Philip Blenkinsop conducting a workshop in Drik Studio in Dhaka. Photo Wahid Adnan/DrikNews

Philip Blenkinsop has been described as “one of the most essential photographers of his generation” (Christian Caujolle). He is adamant that the photographer should never censor scenes through the camera. ?Photographers are both witnesses and messengers. Our responsibility must always lie with the people we focus on, and with the accurate depiction of their plight, regardless of how unpalatable this might be for magazine readers.? His work, published in international arenas, has been the catalyst for much discussion and amongst other accolades was awarded Amnesty International?s Photojournalism prize for excellence in human rights journalism.