Open Letter to the Prime Minister of India

On behalf of the National Oil, Gas, Mineral Resource, Power and Port Protection Committee, Bangladesh

Engineer Sheikh Muhammad Shahidullah

Prof. Anu Muhammad, Member Secretary

Professor Anu Muhammad (centre) and Engineer Sheikh Muhammad Shahidullah (right)
Professor Anu Muhammad (centre) and Engineer Sheikh Muhammad Shahidullah (right). Photo Dhaka Tribune

October 18, 2016
The Honourable Prime Minister,
We respectfully address you with grave concern and anxiety. The people of Bangladesh today is sternly worried over the future of the Sundarbans, which not only happens to be the only protection barrage of the southern belt of Bangladesh, but also the largest Mangrove Forest of the world, as well as the most valuable ecological habitat of the country and the World Heritage Site. The joint venture of both India and Bangladesh to build a1320 MW capacity coal-fired power plant has caused much worry among the people of Bangladesh. Continue reading “Open Letter to the Prime Minister of India”

Majority World exhibition in Rome: Justice in Focus

IDLO Photo Exhibition in Rome
Farnesina Porte Aperte 2015
22 – 29 May 2015

justice in focus in rome

IDLO’s photo exhibition “In Focus: Justice and the Post-2015 Agenda” will form part of this year’s initiative by the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation to open its doors to the general public. From 22 until 29 May 2015, visitors will be able to participate in “Farnesina Porte Aperte” and view the exhibition during guided tours of the building. The Farnesina’s art collection is internationally recognized, and IDLO is proud to have been chosen to exhibit alongside this.

The photographs were also featured by The Guardian.
guardian piece on justice in focus

Curated by IDLO and the photo agency Majority World, the exhibition focuses on the challenges of development and the rule of law. From gender equality and indigenous rights to energy poverty and land tenure, it presents the rule of law as lived experience. The pictures vividly explore the human side of the rule of law and its importance in everyday life.

“In Focus: Justice and the Post-2015 Agenda” illustrates these themes through 32 images – taken by photographers from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Brazil, India and Kenya – ranging from the Amazonian settlement of Colniza, Brazil, where rule of law measures have reversed illegal logging and deforestation, to the energy-starved metropolis of Kibera, Africa’s largest slum.

To sign up for a guided tour, please visit the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation’s Farnesina Porte Aperte website and choose the “art route”, currently available from Monday 25 until Wednesday 27 May.
Before traveling to Rome, the exhibition was shown at the Palais des Nations in Geneva, to coincide with the 28th session of the United Nations Human Rights Council. Over the coming months, it will be shown in Milan, New York, Washington and The Hague, and will return to Rome for an exclusive viewing in November.

For more information, please read this article in Italy’s Corriere della Sera, visit theIDLO mini-site and watch video interviews with the photographers.

In pictures: India coal fires

Underground fires have been burning in the small dusty coal town of Jharia in the eastern Indian state of Jharkhand for more than 80 years now. All efforts to put out the fires have been in vain. Photos: ©Arindam Mukherjee: BBC

Jharia coal fires
In places like Laltenganj, the fires are now burning overground. Continue reading “In pictures: India coal fires”

Phulbari: Santa visits GCM Resources, but investors are left wanting

By , City Diary Editor Telegraph

Environmental activist Ashley Feils was evicted from the GCM Resources AGM after presenting chairman Gerard Holden with a stocking full of coal

Continue reading “Phulbari: Santa visits GCM Resources, but investors are left wanting”

Post-apartheid South Africa kills its miners

by rahnuma ahmed

The unspeakable humiliation of mine workers being regularly inspected by a medical doctor in the diamond mines of South Africa during the apartheid regime for the "theft" of precious stones. 1968 ?Peter Magubane

The first photograph, taken by Peter Magubane, the renowned black South African photographer whose visual documentation of apartheid earned him the tribute of being a “one man truth squad? — had shocked me.
I saw it first in Drik’s 2004 calendar. The picture was accompanied by the words of ?another South African, the internationally acclaimed, award winning playwright and poet Sindiwe Magona. As many of her readers know, Sindiwe had worked as a domestic before earning a graduate degree from Columbia University,
“Father worked in the gold mines of Johannesburg before I was born. I was in my thirties when I first laid eyes on Peter Magubane’s book of photos of “mine boys”. That book angered and disgusted me. But it wasn’t till I came to the corresponding part of my father’s life that a mule kicked me full in the belly. All this time, more than two decades after, the despicable things those photos depicted: grown men “naked as unpodded beans… dusted with sprayings of “DDT” and forced to show their anuses, regular inspection against theft of precious stones” — the vicious truth never penetrated my defences. Continue reading “Post-apartheid South Africa kills its miners”

?We don?t want coal mine?

Documentary Film by Nasrin Siraj Annie

Duration: 23 Min.
Research, narration and direction: Nasrin Siraj Annie
Subject: Social movement against the establishment of an open pit coal mine in Northwest of Bangladesh.
Venue: Drik Gallery
Address: H# 58, R# 15A (new), Dhanmondi R/A
Date: 28 August, 2012
Time: 5:30 p.m
You are cordially invited
Article by Annie in Prothom Alo
??????????? ?????????????? ???????? ????? ????? ???? ???? ?????? ???? ??? ???? ?????????? ????????????? ????? ????????? ????? ????????????? ?? ???? ???? ???????? ??? ???? ??? ?? ?????? ????? ????? ????? ?????? ????? ???? ??????? ?????? ?????????? ??????? ??? ???????? ? ??????? ????? ?????? ????????? ?????????? ????? ?????? ???????; ???????? ????????????? ???????? ??? ?????????????? ????? ??? ????????? ?????????? ???? ?????? ????? ?? ????, ????? ???? ??? ??? ???????? ????, ????????? ?????????? ?????? ???????? ??????? ???????? (????: ?????) ?????? ??????? ???? ???? ????? ??? ????? ??????? ?? ??????? ????? ??????? ???? ??????? ??? ????????? ???????? ????????? ?????????? ????? ??????? ??? ???????????? (??????)? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ??????? ??? ? ???????? ??????? ?????????? ??????? ????????? ?? ??? ????? ???? ?????????? ?????????? ????? ??????? ???? ?????? ??? ??????? ??????? ??????????? ???, ??????????? ?????? ???? ??? ??????? ?????????? ???, ?? ????? ?????? ?????? ????????? ???????? ???????? ???, ?? ??? ??? ?????? ?????? ??? ??????? ?? ????? ??????? ????? ?????? ??? ???? ?? ????? ???? ??????? ???? ???? ????? ??????? ??? ????? ?????? ??????? ???? ???, ????? ??? ?????????? ???? ????? ?????? ????????????? ?????????
??????? ????? ??? ?? ????? ????, ???????, ??? ????????, ??????, ???, ??????????, ???????????, ?????-?????, ????????? ? ??????????? ???????????? ????? ?????? ??????? ????? ???? ??? ?????? ???? ??? ???, ????????? ?????? ??? ?????? ?????????? ?? ???? ?????????? ????????? ????? ?? ????? ??????? ???? ????? ?????? ?????? ????? ???????? ????????? ? ??????? ?????? ??????????? ????? ??? ???? ??? ??? ???? ??????? ????????? ???, ??????? ????????? ???? ????-????-????? ??????? ??? ???????? ???? ???? ???? ??? ???? ???? ?????????? ???????? ????????? ?????? ??????? ???? ????? ??? ????? ??????? ??? ?? ????? ?????? ?????? ?????? ????? ??? ???????? ???? ???? ????????? ???????? ???? ???? ???, ??? ???? ???? ????? ?????, ?????? ???? ????? ??? ???? ?????? ??? ???
????? ????????? ??? ? ??? ??? ???????? ?????????? ???? ???????? ? ???????????? ???????????????? ????????? ??? ????????? (??-?? ?????) ???? ??????????? ??????? ??? ???? ?????? ??? ??????? ????? ??????? ???????? ????? ??? ???????? ?????? ??? ??????? ????? ???? ? ??????? ?????????? ???? ??? ???? ???? ?? ??????? ?????????? ???? ????? ?????? ???? ????????? ???? ??????? ??? ??????? ???????????? ???? ???? ???????????? ?????????????? ???? ??? ??????? ???? ??? ???? ?? ???????????? ?????????????? ????????? ??? ?????????????? ????????? ????? ?? ??? ????? ??????? ??????? ???? ?????? ????? ?????? ????? ? ?????????????? ? ??? ????????? ??????? ???????????? ???????????? ??????? ????????? ???? ?? ?? ???? ?????? ??? ?? ?????? ???? ???????? ? ???????? ????? ??????? ????????????? ?????? ???? ???? ???? ?????? ?????? ????????? ???? ???????? ?? ???????????? ??????????????? ???????? ???? (????, ?????????, ???? ??????) ????? ?????? ???? ??????, ??? ???? ?????? ??? ???????? ?? ???? ??????????????? ??? ???? ???????? ?? ?????? ???????? ???????? ??????? ????????? ????? ?? ???? ?????????? ??????? ?????? ???????? ???? ?????? ???? ?????? ???? ??????? ??????? ??????????? ????? (????: ????????) ????????? ???? ??????????????? ????? ???????
??????????? ????? ???????? ?? ?????? ??? ??????? ??????? ???? ???? ???? ?? ????? ?? ????? ??????? ??????? ????????? ?????? ???? ???? ?????? ??????? ????? ?? ?????? ????? ???????? ????? ???????? ??????????? ???????????? ???????????????? ?????? ??????? ???? ?????, ????? ??? ?? ??????? ??? ????? ??????? ???? ?????????? ???? ?? ????? ???? ?????? ??????? ???????? ???????? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ?? ??? ???? ?????? ?????????? ???? ?????????? ?????? ???? ??????? ?? ????? ???????? ????? ????????? ?????????? ???? ?????????? ???????? ???????? ????????? ??? ???????? ???????????? ???????????????? ???????? ?????, ?????? ?????? ??? ??? ?????? ?????? ????? ????????? ??????? ???????? ?????????????? ???? ?????? ????? ?? ??? ??? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?????? ??????, ?????????? ????? ?????? ??????, ??? ????????? ?????? ?????????? ??????? ??? ???? ????????? ???? ????? ????????????? ??????????? ?????? ????? ????? ?????????? ????, ??????? ??????? ???? ??? ???????? ??? ???? ????? ???? ??????-????????? ??, ???????, ????????? ????????? ???? ????
??? ?????? ??????????, ?????? ??????? ?????, ?????? ????? ???????? ??????? ?????? ???? ??, ????? ?????? ??????? ???????? ??????? ??? ???? ??????? ????? ???????? ???? ?? ????? ??????? ???? ???? ????????? ???????? ????????, ????? ??? ???? ??????? ????? ??????? ????????????? ????? ????? ????? ??????????? ???? ????? ??? ?????? ????, ???? ?????? ???? ??? ???? ??????????? ????? ?????? ??? ?? ???? ??????????????? ??????? ???? ???? ?????????? ??? ???? ???? ???? ?? ????? ????? ???????????, ???? ??????? ????? ????? ????, ????? ??????? ????? ??? ????????? (????: ???????????? ??????????????, ????????? ??????????????) ?????? ???? ??? ??????? ??????? ????? ???, ?????????? ????? ??? ?? ???? ??????????? ?????? ?????? ?????? ???? ???????? ???, ??????????? ??? ??????????? ????? ??????? ??? ?????????????? ???????? ???? ??????, ????? ?????? ?????? ????????? ??? ???? ??????? ?? ??? ???? ????? ????? ??????? ?????? ???? ?? ???? ????? ?????? ??? ??? ????? ?????? ?? ????????? ?? ????? ?? ??? ????, ????? ??? ??????
?????? ?????: ?????????? ? ?????????????? ?????????
Related links:
Phulbari resistance blog
You cannot eat coal
Long March
Profits versus the poor

South Africa Mine Killings: Thousands Protest

 

South African police reveal 34 miners died and 78 were wounded when armed officers opened fire on strikers

By KEITH GLADDIS
Link showing video of shooting and protest (graphic content)
Police in South Africa say 34 miners were killed and another 78 injured when officers fired at strikers armed with ‘dangerous weapons’.
Police chief Mangwashi Victoria Phiyega told a press conference today that her officers acted to protect themselves when miners armed with spears and machetes charged towards them.
Shocking video of the incident emerged yesterday, showing police fire automatic weapons and handguns into the crowd of strikers for about a minute.

Aftermath: South African protesters lie motionless on the ground as heavily armed police officers check them at the Lonmin Platinum Mine near Rustenburg, South AfricaAftermath: South African protesters lie motionless on the ground as heavily armed police officers check them at the Lonmin Platinum Mine near Rustenburg, South Africa Continue reading “South Africa Mine Killings: Thousands Protest”

Not for art's sake

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Abstract of keynote presentation given at National University of Taiwan

8th January 2012. Taipei

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One of the videos presented. A compilation from several videos on major protests in 2011
Long before CSR had become a buzzword and superstars and corporates began to find it essential to have pet social causes to support, we had set up Drik, a small organisation in Bangladesh, which made social justice its raison d’?tre.
Over two decades later, when my show on extra judicial killings at the gallery of Drik, was interpreted by a group of international curators as a ?fantastic performance?. It was time for me to take stock, and see where the art world situated itself and whether I belonged to this marketplace.
As collective movements go, the sub-continent has had its share. Colonial rule, oppression by the landed gentry, women?s struggle for equality in a patriarchal society and the injustice of caste have all been challenged. The solidarity of sustained groups, often against overwhelmingly stronger entities with far greater resources. had been a trademark for undivided India and for Bengal in particular.
It was the dynamics of a ruling class propped up by local agents who stood to profit from inequality, that led to the Gandhian strategy of non-violent resistance. Other methods had also been tried, and Subhas Chandra Bose, with a much more militant outlook, also had a huge following. The Tebhaga peasant movement by the Kisan Sabha had led to laws being formulated that limited the share of the landlords.
Partition did not cure these ills. The ouster of the British did not break up the class structure, but replaced one set of exploiters with another. The British, and other imperial powers continued to maintain unequal trade relations, sometimes in the guise of aid.
Cultural activists in Bangladesh had operated within this milieu. With the military under the control of the West wing, the more populous East Pakistan felt the weight of oppression. Military rule became the vehicle for continued repression but failed to quell the unrest and even the final genocidal attack on the people of East Pakistan, was repulsed by a countrywide resistance.
An independent Bangladesh, free of foreign occupiers, should have been a land free of repression. The reality was very different and cultural activists have had to find new ways of resistance. This has required documentation, articulation and tools of creative expression to deal with injustice in many forms. Having been failed by the major political parties (both government and opposition), cultural actors formed their own groups. Operating with minimum resources, we devised numerous initiatives to mobilise public opinion. Using both new and traditional media, as well as the networking ability of social media we formed lean and tenacious campaigns that chipped away at the establishment and its cohorts insisting on being heard and bent on achieving justice.
But the corporatization of modern Bangladesh has brought about many changes. I remember as a child that we used to respond to natural disasters by grouping together, singing songs, raising money, collecting food and old clothes and going out to affected areas to distribute them. We now leave such activities to the NGOs. Social movements are now sponsored by multinationals and protesters in rallies have sunshades parading the brand logos of telecom companies.
We had simultaneously taken on the hegemony of the west and its new southern accomplices, as well as the repressive regimes that operated within the nation state. But today we also need to examine how social movements have been appropriated, and our inability to operate without ?funding? regardless of the cause seriously limits our capacity for social and political intervention.
As an artist, as an activist, and as an organizer, I have along with my colleagues taken on technology, art, education and culture in its diverse forms and have presented a cohesive front that has challenged the military, major political parties and corporates, while continuing to operate independently within public and private spheres.
The presentation attempts to show how, by resisting not only the formal entities that have usurped power, but also the cultural norms that attempt to pigeon-hole cultural practice in terms of ?fine art?, I as an individual artist, as well as worker in a commune, have tried to ensure that our ?art? does not limit itself to admiration in a gallery. It breathes the gunpowder laden air of street battles with police, the dank vapours of the factory floor and pervades the silence of patriarchal inner chambers.
Shahidul Alam
8th January 2012
Taipei

De-energising Bangladesh

by rahnuma ahmed

In the end, treachery will betray even itself.
Roman proverb
When the prime minister, the finance minister etc., not known for being democratically-oriented, feel obliged to respond publicly according to the terms and conditions set by the National Oil-Gas Committee, it is clear that the tide is shifting.
It is clear that? the National Committee to Protect Oil, Gas, Mineral Resources, Power and Ports (NCPOGMR) has made a significant impact on public consciousness. That there is a growing national awareness of the issue of ownership of natural resources; of the terms on which production sharing contracts are signed with international oil companies (IOCs); a growing suspicion that exporting extracted gas may not be the best way of solving the nation’s energy shortfall. More precisely, of the hollowness of the government’s reasoning as to why gas blocks need to be, must necessarily be, leased out to multinational companies.? More broadly, of whether the nation’s ruling class, regardless of which political party is in power, does act in the interests of the nation, of its people.
It is clear from what top ruling party leaders are now obliged to say, to repeatedly say, we are patriotic, we are not treacherous, that they have been forced to cede ground.
It is clear that a moral battle has been won.
Continue reading “De-energising Bangladesh”