CITIZENS CALL FOR BANGLADESH TO RESPOND IN SUPPORT OF ICC PROSECUTOR’S SUBMISSION ON ROHINGYA DEPORTATION

As Bangladeshi individuals and organisations engaged in seeking justice for those subjected to violations of rights, we welcome the request of the International Criminal Court (ICC) Prosecutor for a ruling by ICC judges on whether the ICC has jurisdiction to investigate the deportation of Rohingya people from Myanmar from 25 August 2017 onwards. We call on the Government to respond to the invitation from ICC Pre-Trial Chamber I to Bangladesh authorities to submit, by 11 June 2018, observations on the question and to support the Prosecutor’s request.

Photo: K.M. Asad/Drik/Majority World

The ICC Pre-Trial Chamber’s decision of 7 May has been made in response to the 9 April Request by the ICC Prosecutor, seeking a ruling on whether the Court has jurisdiction over the deportations of Rohingya people from Myanmar as a crime against humanity. Continue reading “CITIZENS CALL FOR BANGLADESH TO RESPOND IN SUPPORT OF ICC PROSECUTOR’S SUBMISSION ON ROHINGYA DEPORTATION”

Fellowship in Burma

From Gary Knight

If you are a writer, photographer, videographer or radio journalist from the USA or Burma with 3 years experience and in your 20’s or 30’s and are interested in a paid media Fellowship in Burma for 3 weeks learning with the great Denis Gray – AP Bureau Chief in Thailand for 30 years, founder of Noor photo agency Philip Blenkinsop<https://www.facebook.com/philipsablenkinsop?group_id=0>, Asia Works TV founder Marc Laban, Global Post founder Charles Sennott, former NPR Bureau Chief Michael Sullivan, new media and Global Post editor Kevin Grant<https://www.facebook.com/kevindgrant?group_id=0>, AP Burma Bureau Chief Aye Aye Win, former AP bureau Chief Robin Hammond, VII Photo Agency founder Gary Knight<https://www.facebook.com/garymichaelknight?group_id=0>, and attend lectures by Bertil Lintner and Thant Myint U and leaders of Burmese civil society, meet Aung San Suu Kyi for dinner and have the experience of a lifetime then apply for this Fellowship ……..
Burma Reporting Fellowship for US and Burmese Journalists.
Open Hands Initiative and The GroundTruth Project are pleased to announce a reporting fellowship in Burma for 20 top, young correspondents?10 from America and 10 from Burma. The all-expense-paid journalism fellowship, entitled “Burma Telling Its Own Story,” will take place in Burma June 10-June 30. The fellowship will emphasize writing and radio broadcasting, as well as hands-on training in photography and videography by leading journalists from around the world with the participation of leading figures from civil society in Burma.
APPLY NOW
Please send a CV, at least three examples of your work and a letter explaining why you feel uniquely qualified to take part in this fellowship and what you hope to accomplish if your application is successful. Please address the letters to GlobalPost co-founder and Executive Editor Charles M. Sennott.
Deadline for applications is April 7th and the list of fellows will be notified on April 15.
Please send applications to?[email protected]
<https://www.facebook.com/shares/view?id=167496060071661>
Gary Knight
Founder & Director
The Program for Narrative & Documentary Practice.
IGL. Tufts University.
96 Packard Avenue, Medford, Massachusetts. 02155.
USA

When hope is denied

The Amnesty International?s Dutch magazine, ‘Wordt Vervolgd? invited six world recognised experts to look back at human rights issue?s of 2012.
It is a special feature of 6 images which represent 6 human rights issue?s from 2012. Last year AI had a similar successful feature by 6 international respected photographers about the arab spring.
The following photograph by Pathshala alumni Munir uz Zaman was selected by Shahidul Alam.

Rohingya Muslims look on from an intercepted boat in Teknaf on June 13, 2012. Munir uz Zaman / AFP – Getty Images

What is remarkable about this photograph is the absence of a gaze. Except for the woman who appears to look straight past the photographer it is as if the refugees have withdrawn from the world itself. Hounded by one nation, rejected by another, they are forced to return to their persecutors. Being returned to the jaws of death by the people they had considered their saviours. Land is the only material possession of an agrarian community. Farmers leave only when no other option exists. Their only hope is the belief that someone will shelter them from harm. Respond to their helplessness.
It is only at times like these that women and children venture out on their own. Facing strangers, men, in lands unknown, they willingly face probable dangers to flee certain ones. Bangladesh is not a signatory to the 1951 Refugee Convention or its 1967 protocol, but as a predominantly Muslim nation it theoretically offers a less hostile environment relative to the largely Buddhist Myanmar state which accuses Rohingyas of instigating violence. Given that millions of Bangladeshis were sheltered by neighbouring India during Bangladesh?s own civil war, sending back persecuted Rohingya refugees is callous in religious, historical and humanitarian grounds.
Pages from WV_NR12

Sectarian Unrest in Burma

Pathshala alumni, K M Asad, Monirul Alam and Andrew Biraj, covering Rohingya exodus to Bangladesh.

Read more:?http://world.time.com/2012/06/11/sectarian-unrest-in-burma/?xid=rss-photoessays#rohingya-refugees-from-myanmar-sit-on-a-boat-as-they-try-to-get-into-bangladesh-in-teknaf#ixzz1xgxD1VUL
Photos by K M Asad

Rohingya Muslims gesture as they try to cross the Naf river in Teknaf on June 11, 2012. Bangladesh border guards and coastguard patrol teams pushed back eight boats carrying more than 300 Rohingya Muslims, mostly women and children, fleeing religious violence in Myanmar, a border guard said. Bangladesh has stepped up security along the border with Myanmar and in refugee camps where tens of thousands of Rohingya live, after a surge in sectarian unrest in Myanmar. Photo: K M Asad

Rohingya Muslims fleeing sectarian violence try to cross the Naf river into Bangladesh in Teknaf on June 11, 2012. Bangladesh border guards and coastguard patrol teams pushed back eight boats carrying more than 300 Rohingya Muslims, mostly women and children, fleeing religious violence in Myanmar, a border guard said. Bangladesh has stepped up security along the border with Myanmar and in refugee camps where tens of thousands of Rohingya live. Photo: K M Asad

 
Bangladesh border guards (L) push back Rohingya Muslims as they try to cross the Naf river into Bangladesh in Teknaf on June 11, 2012. Bangladesh border guards and coastguard patrol teams pushed back eight boats carrying more than 300 Rohingya Muslims, mostly women and children, fleeing religious violence in Myanmar, a border guard said. Bangladesh has stepped up security along the border with Myanmar and in refugee camps where tens of thousands of Rohingya live. Photo: K M Asad

Rubbing shoulders: Aung San Suu Kyi, Abbas Kiarostami, Gayatri Spivak

Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak is an Indian literary critic, a theorist, and a University Professor, the highest honor for professors at Columbia University, where she is a founding member of the school's Institute for Comparative Literature and Society. Professor Spivak was speaking at a seminar at Dhaka University, organised by Naya Krishi, a farmers' cooperative in Bangladesh. ?: Shahidul Alam/Drik/Majority World

She was witty, connected, caring and sharp. Seamlessly moving between colloquial Bangla, bhodrolok Bangla and English, Spivak mesmerised, but did a few ticking offs too. All in her charming style so it took you a while to work out that a steam roller had gone over you. It was standing room only in packed seminar room at Dhaka University. Spivak was one of five visiting speakers, but clearly the one they had all come to see.
I was lucky as I had just returned from Tehran, when Rahnuma told me of the event, and Chulie and Yan managed to get my 100mm macro lens to me in time and I pedalled off to Dhaka University.
A couple of days back, I had made my way to Chiraz Square in Tehran to meet up with my old friend, the brilliant film maker and photographer Abbas Kiarostami. I returned with an arm load of books, including his early masterpiece, Snow White. Here are a couple of pictures from the book:
From the book: Snow White. Photo: Abbas Kiarostami

 
From the book Snow White. Photo: Abbas Kiarostami

The meeting earlier with Aung San Suu Kyi, in Myanmar was opportunistic. But hey with people like that, one doesn’t care how it works out 🙂
 
 
 
 

Chance meeting

An old student Zin Myoe Sett had set up a meeting with the big wigs of the Myanmar Photographic Society. Christophe Loviny had briefly dropped in to give me an invitation to thier opening at the France Institute of the show?”Aung San Suu Kyi, The Burmese Way to Democracy”. They say the rains in Yangon start on the 20th May. The clouds had obviously not read the script.

Burmese opposition?politician and General Secretary of the?National League for Democracy?(NLD) in Myanmar Aung San Suu Kyi (born 19 June 1945) at the French Institute in Myanmar where she was inaugurating the photo exhibition "Aung San Suu Kyi, The Burmese Way to Democracy". Photo (c) Shahidul Alam/Drik/Majority World

New humility for the hegemon

Subscribe to ShahidulNews


Share


India and its near-abroad

Too slowly, India is realising that poor relations with its South Asian neighbours hold back its global ambitions

Jul 30th 2011 | from the print edition of the Economist

NO ONE loves a huge neighbour. For all that, India?s relations with the countries that ring it are abysmal. Of the eight with which it shares a land or maritime boundary, only two can be said to be happy with India: tiny Maldives, where India has the only foreign embassy and dispenses much largesse, and Bhutan, which has a policy of being happy about everything. Among its other South Asian neighbours, the world?s biggest democracy is incredible mainly because of its amazing ability to generate wariness and resentment.
Until recently it operated a shoot-to-kill policy towards migrant workers and cattle rustlers along its long border with Bangladesh. Over the years it has meddled madly in Nepal?s internal affairs. In Myanmar India snuggles up to the country?s thuggish dictators, leaving the beleaguered opposition to wonder what happened to India?s championing of democracy. Relations with Sri Lanka are conflicted. It treats China with more respect, but feuds with it about its border.
As for Pakistan, relations are defined by their animosity. One former Indian diplomat likened reconciling the two nuclear-tipped powers to treating two patients whose only disease is an allergy to each other. The observation underscores the fact that it takes two to have bad relations, and to be fair to India plenty of problems press in on it?many of them with their roots in India?s bloody partition in 1947. Pakistan has used a long-running territorial dispute over Kashmir as a reason to launch wars. It also exports terrorism to India, sometimes with the connivance of parts of the Pakistani state. India thinks Bangladesh also harbours India-hating terrorists.
With the notable exception of India?s prime minister, Manmohan Singh, who has heroically persisted in dialogue with Pakistan in the face of provocations and domestic resistance, India?s dealings with its neighbours are mostly driven by arrogance and neglect. It has shared shockingly little of its economic dynamism and new-found prosperity with those around it. Just 5% of South Asia?s trade is within the region.

Too little and too late, the neglect is starting to be replaced by engagement (see?article). This week Sonia Gandhi, dynastic leader of India?s ruling Congress Party, visited Bangladesh?a first. And on July 27th India?s foreign minister hosted his Pakistani counterpart, the first such meeting in a year. He promised a ?comprehensive, serious and sustained? dialogue.
A new regional engagement is prodded by two things. China?s rapid and increasingly assertive rise challenges India?s own regional dominance. As a foundation for its rise, China pursued a vigorous ?smile diplomacy? towards its neighbours that stands in contrast to slothful Indian energies. The smile has sometimes turned to snarl of late (see?Banyan). Even so, China?s engagement with its neighbours has allowed it both to prosper and to spread influence.

 interactive map displays the various territorial claims of India, Pakistan and China from each country’s perspective

Second, dynamic India can hardly soar globally while mired in its own backyard. Promoting regional prosperity is surely the best way to persuade neighbours that its own rise is more of an opportunity than a threat. Yet India lacks any kind of vision. A region-wide energy market using northern neighbours? hydropower would transform South Asian economies. Vision, too, could go a long way to restoring ties that history has cut asunder, such as those between Karachi and Mumbai, once sister commercial cities but now as good as on different planets; and Kolkata and its huge former hinterland in Bangladesh. Without development and deeper integration, other resentments will be hard to soothe. It falls on the huge unloved neighbour to make the running.
BBC Documentary on Sino-Indian Rivalry and Bangladesh


http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/worldservice/docarchive/docarchive_20100630-1227a.mp3